“ a compromise formula which includes a proposal to take top 20% students based on percentile ranking of respective boards for preparing the merit list”

How meaningless is this solution ?. Higher education in India will become the domain of the school toppers and Children of affluent parents and we wonder why half a million students leave India to study undergraduate courses overseas. Children who will never return to a country that shunned them.

Is this is what we call inclusive in RTE ?.

God Save India

Inclusive education does not mean that everyone must enter, or pass out from, an IIT. It only means that if you wanted to, you could have a shot at it. The child labourer is excluded because she can never dream of entering an IIT; she may absolutely hate IIT, but not trying to join an IIT should be her decision. Even if there is only one IIT train, every child must have access to the platform where the train comes. Of course, not everyone will get on to the train but everyone knows what to do to have a shot at the train. This is called inclusion in education. Everyone must go to school till class 12; those who work hard, and are willing to work harder still, will join an IIT. Others will, by choice, decide not to work that hard and become economists.

Shubhashis Gangopadhyay


All children are born equal and mindless politicians are trying to grade the children and youth of the nation and create a new Brahamanical Caste system in Education, which is pandering to the neo rich who can afford to send their children to elite private schools and Coaching schools.

"HRD Ministry of India wants to build castles of higher education on the bamboo scaffoldings of its schools" ~ Satish Jha

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Thursday, March 15, 2012

36 - New IITs are a disaster, says PM's scientific adviser IBN LIve


New IITs are a disaster, says PM's scientific adviser


New Delhi: Prime Minister Manmohan Singh's initiative to establish eight new Indian Institutes of Technology (IITs) has drawn flak from his own scientific adviser C.N.R. Rao, who said on Friday that the opening of so many new IITs is a “disaster”.
“Opening so may IITs in one year is a disaster. I had no idea that so many IITs have already come up in our country,” he told reporters on the sidelines of an event at the Federation of Indian Cambers of Commerce and Industry (FICCI).
Six new IITs - in Orissa, Bihar, Rajasthan, Punjab and Andhra Pradesh - have started operations from the current academic session. India now has 13 IITs.
“This is not a play. To open IITs, you need proper planning. There are makeshift campuses and some are even attending classes in old IITs,” said the renowned scientist.
“I came to know about this development after the institutes admitted students. This is sad and I have told the prime minister and even the human resource development minister (Arjun Singh) about this. I am dissatisfied with the developments,” said Rao, a visiting professor at Cambridge University.
IITs are premier engineering colleges of the country. Manmohan Singh has already announced that India will have eight new IITs, including the six opened this year, to boost engineering and technology education.
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From: Ravikumar Bhaskaran IITKgp 
Date: Sat, 21 May 2011 20:33:44 -0700 (PDT)

As  recently as Jan. 2011,  the Minister for HRD Shri Kapil Sibal himsel admitted that the new IITs set up in 2008 suffer from poor infrastructure and are not upto the mark and are finding it difficult to  attract and retain their faculty.  

This was only expected and even the scientific adviser to the PM Prof.C.N.Rao had expressed strong views even as early as 2008 that starting so many IITs together is a disaster. 

The total lack of planning while starting 8 new IITs together may be seen from the fact that all the new IITs started with the same set of B.Tech. programmes in CSE, EE and ME ( except for IIT Bhubaneswar and IIT Gandhinagar which started programmes in Civil Engineering and Chemical Engineering respectively in the place of the B.Tech. programme in CSE).  It should have been obvious to anyone that it would be impossible to find the required number of faculty with the right background to man the 8 departments of EEE and ME and 6 Departments in CSE which has come up at the 8 new IITs at the same time. The older 7 IITs are also short of faculty in these departments arising out of retirements and increase in student strength taking place every year. Simultaneously a number of NITs and other institutions like IIITs etc. have also come up in the country, targeting faculty for the same CSE,EE and ME departments. A quick persual of the websites of the new IITs will reveal the sad state of affairs in terms of inadequate number of regular faculty for different departments at the new IITs. A revolving door syndrome may also be seen among the faculty, namely the migration of faculty from one of the new IIT to another and from one of the new IIT to an older IIT. However, there seems to be very little movement of faculty from the old IITs to the new ones, apparently because of a rule that has been imposed that faculty enjoying pension benefits at the older IITs would loose the same if they migrate from an old IIT to the new IIT. The faculty recruited for the new IITs and those who have been recruited in the old IITs too in recent times ( like all others recruited in recent times for Central Govt. services) are not entitled to the pension scheme applicable to the senior faculty, as I understand.

Most of these new IITs have also not yet started construction of their own campuses though they started in 2008/2009. Some are yet to get the land from the concerned State Government. The students of these new IITs ( except possibly two started an year later) have come to the final year. Infrastructure at the exiting premises is  inadequate in the case of most of these new IITs, in the circumstances. Many of them are unable to start new programmes. particularly M.Tech. programmes, on that account. If these were private self-financing colleges they would have been deaffiliated by the concerned University by now and the IIT Professors themselves, serving on AICTE inspection committees for the private colleges, would have recommended derecognition of these Institutions to the AICTE! Deemed Universities suffering from such lacunae would have been derecognised by the MHRD. 

In my view Pan IIT alumni should express their concern to the Minister for HRD, as the brand IIT image will take  severe beating if necessary steps are not taken to address these issues urgently.

-RB
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From: Sriram IITM
Date: Sun, 22 May 2011 17:59:35 +0530 (IST)

On Sat, 21 May 2011, Ravikumar Bhaskaran wrote:
> However, there seems to be very little movement
> of faculty from the old IITs to the new ones, apparently because of a rule
> that has been imposed that faculty enjoying pension benefits at the older
> IITs would loose the same if they migrate from an old IIT to the new IIT.
> The faculty recruited for the new IITs and those who have been recruited in
> the old IITs too in recent times ( like all others recruited in recent times
> for Central Govt. services) are not entitled to the pension scheme
> applicable to the senior faculty, as I understand.


The underlying issue is true (acute faculty shortage in new IITs), but
this particular pension issue is solvable, I believe. The old Government
pension scheme is closed as of 2004 and all central government employees
recruited since then are in a standard contributory (non-pension)
retirement scheme. Since the new IITs were started more recently, they
have no provision for anything other than this new contributory scheme,
even if one was shifting was a previous job with the pension scheme. At
the old IITs, those entering the system after 2004 are in this new scheme,
but those who shift from a previous job covered under the old pension
scheme are allowed to continue in the old pension scheme. We need to make
some procedural change that will enable this in the new IITs, I think this
is doable with some influence and lobbying from alums, for example. But I
am not sure this is the main reason people are not going to the new IITs -
many seem to be adopting the wait-and-watch strategy. Senior faculty
members, even those from Hyderabad, for example, are reluctant to shift
from IITM to IITH citing above reason. They are wary.

> In my view Pan IIT alumni should express their concern to the Minister for
> HRD, as the brand IIT image will take  severe beating if necessary steps are
> not taken to address these issues urgently.

I would put a slightly different spin on this; we should accept the new
IITs as one of our own and see what we can do so that the brand image does
not get diluted. We should extend all lobbying and other support so these
new IITs come up to speed faster - they don't have alums like us, and so
it is up to us to do this.

sriram
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From: Ravikumar Bhaskaran IITKgp 
Date: Sun, 22 May 2011 18:26:35 -0700 (PDT)

I agree with Prof.Sriram. PAN IIT India representing alumni of all IITs should wake up to the situation and try to be see what could be done to ensure that Brand IIT does not get diluted. The fact is that we cannot wish away the new IITs and the fact that the hundreds of IIT alumni passing out of the new IITs would be joining the fold of PAN IIT Alumni from 2012.  I request the Secretary General of PIAI to please discuss the subject with the President of PIAI and take this matter up as an item in the next EC Meet ( I hope such meetings are held regularly and important issues concerning PAN IIT Alumni are discussed at these meetings - why not be transparent and put up the Minutes of these Meetings in the PIAI website?)
-RB
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